All You Need To De-Clutter Your Home Now Is Common Sense!
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All You Need To De-Clutter Your Home Now Is Common Sense!

Mental Wellbeing
Sumiran Annamaria Kashyap Trainee Yogi, Energy Healing Enthusiast
3 min read

All You Need To De-Clutter Your Home Now Is Common Sense!

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Those toys from your childhood, wrappers of your favourite chocolate, the school books, old clothes, gift boxes, birthday cards, and everything else that you keep saving may be sucking away your energy. Declutter your surroundings, like you must – your mind.

Mark Twain, Albert Einstein, Steve Jobs – creative and technical geniuses, all proud owners of very cluttered working spaces. Believe it or not, there is scientific evidence in favour of clutter and enhanced creativity, but it’s a correlation, not a causal relationship. Clutter doesn't make us creative. But, since by definition, creativity essentially requires thinking ‘outside’ of conventional boundaries, this manifests itself quite literally, in the way a creative person, a ‘mad scientist’, would (or wouldn’t) organise the space around them.  

Some food for thought. The same rationale accommodates for the possibility of a brain, multitasking in several directions, manifesting itself in a disorganised, haphazard living space. Interestingly, there’s scientific evidence supporting the connection between physical accumulation of clutter, and mental tendencies to suffer from anxiety, inability to ‘let go’, or the often unrealistic belief that one doesn't ‘have enough’. Such people believe they’re ‘shielding’ themselves with the things they collect, and become hoarders. The prospect of de-cluttering is scary for them, because they connect the remnant empty space with loneliness. Like the mental clutter, the physical clutter:

  • is a continuous assault on our senses and energies;
  • makes us anxious/stresses us out, because it’s a constant reminder that our work isn't ‘done-and-dusted’;
  • induces embarrassment/ guilt, as it indicates unsystematic living, and laziness.

Here are a few pointers on how you can declutter your home, and de-stress yourself:

  • On a daily basis, clean as you go. Get rid of yesterday’s newspapers, or last month’s magazines; don't procrastinate about organising the crockery/spice cabinet.
  • Don’t wait for the change of seasons to conduct a mass household cleaning. Examine your collection of make-up/accessories/clothes monthly. Do you really need things you haven't used in 6 months or more? Discard those past their expiration date, and donate those in respectable condition to charity, or even to your household staff. Something collecting dust in your wardrobe could actually make an underprivileged person’s day.
  • Be creative/resourceful. Recycle items within the house before you decide to bin them. A gift hamper tray could double up as a hand towel tray, empty tins/boxes could hold your hairbrushes/your child’s crayons.
  • Indulge in an inventory exercise before buying more. If you do purchase, allocate space for the item(s) the day you get them. Don’t leave them in their packaging on your table, or in some corner of your room for days!
  • Lastly, don't overwhelm yourself, trying to clear up the entire house in a day. Take out a feasible amount of time daily, covering portion by portion.

Compulsive hoarding shouldn't be confused with opulence, or being house-proud. Simplicity and minimalism are the hallmarks of a harmonious, well-planned home – and lifestyle. In fact, freeing the mind from unnecessary stimuli in the environment only makes more space for the constructive sort of creativity!

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Sumiran Annamaria Kashyap

Sumiran Annamaria Kashyap

Trainee Yogi, Energy Healing Enthusiast
Sumiran Kashyap Sahni is a chamomile tea loving freelance writer; formerly a caffeine loving financial services recruitment consultant. Her areas of interest are health and wellness, beauty, fashion, (a smattering of) prose, and any work of nature, or the human hand, that delights her heart. On the World Wide Web, she’s also known as Thinking Totty. She specifically writes about health and wellness from a lifestyle-choice perspective, and gets all her bright ideas when she’s practicing yoga, or chakra and reiki meditation.
Sumiran Annamaria Kashyap

Sumiran Annamaria Kashyap

Trainee Yogi, Energy Healing Enthusiast
Sumiran Kashyap Sahni is a chamomile tea loving freelance writer; formerly a caffeine loving financial services recruitment consultant. Her areas of interest are health and wellness, beauty, fashion, (a smattering of) prose, and any work of nature, or the human hand, that delights her heart. On the World Wide Web, she’s also known as Thinking Totty. She specifically writes about health and wellness from a lifestyle-choice perspective, and gets all her bright ideas when she’s practicing yoga, or chakra and reiki meditation.


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